by Sheila Julson

Acoustic wave therapy is a non-invasive technique that directs bursts of energy pulses to an area of injury, stimulating muscular and ligamentous tissue to promote healing. The therapy has been used extensively throughout Europe and Canada by physical therapists to treat multiple musculoskeletal issues. In recent years, acoustic wave therapy has made its way to the United States. Inland Wellness & Vitality, specializing in sexual health and age management services for men and women, has been using acoustic wave therapy to ease stress fractures, tendonitis, muscle strains and tightness, scar tissue, heel spurs, chronic pain and more.

Dr. Jacob Deakins and his brother, registered nurse Peter Deakins, have offered acoustic wave therapy since they opened Inland Wellness & Vitality last February. Acoustic wave therapy imparts force to break down scar tissue and calcium deposits, releasing restrictions and allowing for increased mobility and decreased pain.

To determine if a patient is a good candidate for acoustic wave therapy, he or she begins with an initial consult with the doctor. The patient lies on an exam table or sits in a chair while the practitioner uses a D-ACTOR applicator to apply short bursts of low-intensity energy pulses to injured areas on the body.

“There are different treatment protocols for different areas,” Peter explains. “Generally, treatments last from 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the site affected, and generally we look at anywhere from three to six treatments.”

If the injury site is sensitive, there may be some discomfort experienced during treatment. To reduce any pain during or after the treatment session, the physician or therapist can adjust the intensity of the therapy to promote analgesia at the start of the treatment. An acoustic wave applicator can be used before the treatment to gently release the muscles, as well as after to remove waste products from the body.

Many patients notice that their pain decreases or even disappears after the first treatment. There may be some bruising, swelling or soreness one to two hours afterwards due to an inflammatory response of the body to the acoustic wave therapy. This is normal and is the body’s way of healing itself and regenerating the targeted tissue. After a short number of treatments, Peter says many patients have reported long-term pain relief and improvement of chronic conditions. Acoustic wave therapy has also been used as an alternative to pharmaceuticals to improve erectile dysfunction by increasing blood flow to the penis.Source: Inland Wellness & Vitality, 316 W. Boone Ave., Ste. 350, Rock Pointe Tower, Spokane. For more information, contact 509-474-0145 or visit InlandWellnessandVitality.com.